Adam Smith's Simplified Theory of Moral Sentiments, Part 2, Section 2, Chapter 2: The Sense of Justice, Remorse, and the Consciousness of Merit

Chapter 2: The Sense of Justice, Remorse, and the Consciousness of Merit

Justice requires a lowered ego

11Only the just indignation for evil done to us is the only proper motive for us to:

No impartial spectator can go along with a person's natural preference for his own happiness above that of others in order to:

By nature, everyone is first and principally recommended to his own care.

12 The sufferer's resentment runs naturally higher the greater and more irreparable the evil that is done.

 

Remorse

13 The violator of justice can never reflect on the people's feelings without feeling shame, horror, and consternation.

 

14 The opposite behaviour naturally inspires the opposite sentiment.


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Next: Chapter 3: The Utility of the Sense of Justice