Adam Smith's Simple Theory of Moral Sentiments, Part 2, Section 1, Chatper 5: The Analysis of the Sense of Merit and Demerit



Chap. 5: The analysis of the sense of Merit and Demerit


2.1.22. 1. Our sense of the propriety of conduct comes from a direct sympathy with the actor's affections and motives.

2.1.23. We cannot thoroughly enter into the beneficiary's gratitude, unless we approve of the benefactor's motives beforehand.

2.1.24. Many times, we may plainly distinguish those two emotions uniting together in our sense of the good desert of a particular character or action.

2.1.25. 2. Our sense of the impropriety of conduct arises from a lack of sympathy or from a direct antipathy to the agent's affections and motives.

2.1.26. We cannot enter into the sufferer's resentment unless our heart beforehand:

Likewise, the sense of merit and demerit are compounded sentiments made up of two distinct emotions:

2.1.27. Here we can plainly distinguish those two emotions uniting in our sense of the ill desert of a particular character or action.


Words: 775
Please post comments and suggestions to our Facebook group